Project Description

Un-corporate portraits

I’m going to nail my colours to the mast early on here. I hate company profile photography.

It usually falls into one of the following categories:

  • It’s not important, so everyone supplies their own, leading to a mix of grumpy selfies (bad) and holiday snapshots (worse).
  • Janice from accounts ‘has a camera’ and is railroaded into taking a rogues gallery of wonky, blurry photos next to the filing cabinet.
  • The company pays a fortune for a set of ‘corporate’ mugshots that make everyone look like they were stamped from the same mould at the Zero Personality factory.

Okay, rant over.

When I was commissioned to take the staff portraits for a creative agency, I wanted to capture two things: the spirit of the organisation and the personality of each subject.

To help them out of their shells, I suggested we play a little game.

I asked them to act out various scenarios to capture their expressions.

Firstly, I told them they’d crashed into the boss’s car but someone else had got the blame.

Portrait_boss

I asked them to think of something that really pissed them off.

Portrait_angry

I asked for their best toddler-entertaining face.

Portrait_babyface

I asked them to look sexy.

Portrait_sexy

And I told them something so outrageously scandalous about one of their colleagues that I couldn’t possibly repeat it here (their lawyers might be watching).

Portrait_shocking

Sometimes, people can freeze when a camera is pointed at them. By making the session a playtime, everyone engaged with the camera, had a giggle doing it, and contributed to a great set of images that truly conveyed the attitude and spirit of the company.

Portrait_laughing